2015 – My Year in Books

Now back to books. 2015 was a very varied year for me, I was reading and reviewing books for ‘Belle About Town’ but also reading a book a month with my book club. I have to say having not one, not two but three outlets to discuss the books I read is really rewarding and I know I have said it in a previous post but thank you so much to all the people who have read, commented and liked my blog. It really means a lot, and this year I want to try and make sure I’m writing a least a blog post a week. I thought it would be fun for me to share some stats with you about my reading habits in 2015, and I’d love to know yours too, so please do comment below.

The first book I read in 2015 was ‘Foxcatcher: A True Story of Murder, Madness and The Quest for Olympic Gold’ by Mark Schultz and the last book I read in 2015 was ‘Forever’ by Judy Blume.

The book that made me cry the most in 2015 was ‘The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry’ by Rachel Joyce. I’m talking full on crying with snot and everything, I’m just glad I was at home when I finished reading it as I think my fellow commuters would have been fearful had it been on the train.

The book that made me laugh the most was ‘Bossypants’ by Tina Fey. I genuinely laughed out loud and even snorted like a pig at one point, unfortunately this did happen on a rather crowded train during peak time and the person who was sat next to me moved seats at the next stop…How subtle.

The most powerful book I read was ‘Asking for It’ by Louise O’Neill. I read and reviewed this for ‘Belle About Town’ it was without doubt one of the most raw and infuriating books I have read. An incredibly important YA novel that all teenagers and adults alike should read.

Favourite literary magazine had to be ‘The Happy Reader’ by Penguin Classics. A seasonal magazine that interviews a well-known celebrity about their reading habits and then dissects a chosen book. Perfect for book recommendations/inspiration.

My favourite book of the year has to be ‘The Martian’ by Andy Weir. It had me hooked from the opening sentence and kept me that way until the very end. Weir seemed to perfectly balance, science, tension and humour and it was the top of my list of book recommendations whenever people asked me what they should be reading. Also the film adaptation was pretty accurate and perfectly executed which is a rarity.

I only re-read TWO books this year and they were ‘Matilda’ by Roald Dahl and ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens. This is a miracle for me as I tend to re-read books out of some form of need for comfort and nostalgia so this is like a breakthrough for me.

I have plenty of books on my ‘TBR’ pile and there’s plenty of new titles coming out this year that I am looking forward to reading, so I have a feeling 2016 is going to be just as good as last year. Please comment below with your favourite read of 2015 and anything else you want to share.

Happy reading my lovelies.

Georgina.

x

Advertisements

Heart Shaped Box – A Review

I’m a proud member of Manchester Women’s Institute and actually run the sub-group for reading. We’re called ‘The Bookish Broads’ and once a month we meet for tea/coffee and cake and discuss the book selected from the previous month’s meeting. This month we’ll be discussing the book that was selected as part of the Halloween/Horror theme for the October meeting.

Heart Shaped Box by Joe Hill.

Heart Shaped Box Joe Hill

I read Horns by Joe Hill last year and loved it. It was dark, humorous, tragic and kinda weird, which I liked. As soon as I posted that I was reading it on Facebook I had so many people telling me I just had to read Heart Shaped Box, so l went out, bought a copy, put the book on the shelf and never gave it another thought (ominous considering one of the chapters of the books only consists of the words ‘He put the box on the shelf, in the back of his closet and decided to stop thinking about it.’ Until recently that is, I put it forward as my suggestion and the lovely ladies of the Manchester WI selected it. I think we were all relived that it seemed less of a chore to read than Life after Life by Kate Atkinson.

I settled down one evening and was gripped from the word go. I’m something of a novice to the horror genre, with the exception of a couple of horror related novels, it’s not a genre I’m overly familiar with. But with Joe Hill being the son of horror writing legacy Stephen King, I should have known that this would be a cracking book, and I wasn’t disappointed. This isn’t something I have divulged in any previous blog posts but I have always had a fear of a certain type of ghost. The idea of ghosts in general don’t really bother me but anything that involves creepy old men in old suits or women in old fashioned black dresses really sends me reeling. Which is funny considering that I have read the book Woman in Black, seen the film and the theatrical adaptation, why do I do it to myself? I don’t know but I suppose that I like to feel ‘something’ I like to experience an emotion when I read something or watch something, and I can tell you Heart Shaped Box delivered plenty of those moments for me.

Judas Coyne is an ageing rock star who collects macabre things, when he is told that there is a haunted suit for sale on the internet he asks his assistant Danny to buy it. Little does he know that the suit is haunted by the ghost of a man named Craddock who is set on destroying Judas’ life, the reason? He blames Judas for the death of his step-daughter. The storyline is interesting enough but it’s the haunting imagery that Joe penned that really struck a chord with me.

‘In the moments that followed, Jude felt it was a matter of life and death not to make eye contact with the old man, to give no sign that he saw him.’

Moments like this, for me, perfectly capture the cold fear we all feel at some point. When I was a little girl I used to wake sometimes in the evening and would need to build up the courage to go to the bathroom in the dark, I’d be as quick as I could walking back to my room and would always have the sensation that someone was watching me, like Judas in this sentence, I always felt that it was always much safer if I never looked back and just climbed under the covers and squeezed my eyes shut. It’s that inexplicable fear that something just doesn’t feel right.

‘He smiled at Jude, showing crooked and stained teeth and his black tongue.’

As the book progresses the dead man, Craddock, grows more and more violent and controlling of Jude and his girlfriend Georgia. When the pair decide to get away from the house things get even creepier and weirder and it’s soon revealed that Craddock was a controlling and abusive man in life too. There’s a very human element to the story that deals with abuse and estranged relationships between families, which stops this book from falling short of being a little too cheesy at times, and adds some much needed realism. That being said there were aspects towards the latter part of the book that just seemed to not make any sense to me as the actions didn’t seem to fit in with the story as whole. Saying that it was an enjoyable read and full of imagery that had me genuinely shuddering at times, another great novel from Joe Hill.

Star Rating out of 5: 4

spookygifquote

‘He could see himself there, and the dead man standing beside him, hunched over, whispering in his ear.’

Happy reading fellow bookworms, let me know your thoughts if you have read this, or even if you plan to read it.

Georgina.

x