Quick Review – Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

I remember the day I walked into Waterstones in a particularly spooky mood. I was looking for a good horror book or something that would make me low-key nervous about turning over the page and finding out what would happen to the protagonist next. I came across and the blurb on the back instantly struck a chord with me.

Hex TOH

Based in the fictional town of Black Spring it tells the story of the Black Rock Witch, a 17th Century woman who wanders the town with her eyes and mouth sewn shut, thestory goes, if the stitches come undone, the whole town will die. She is monitored by various cameras around the town and most of the residents tend to forget she is there most of the time. 

But there’s always one bad egg, when a local boy starts attacking the witch, her behaviour turns erratic and she starts acting differently.Pretty soon, the whole mood of the town begins to change with some people, as well as the witch, acting completely out of character.

I won’t go too in depth about what happens, in case you want to read it but I found a gripping read and there were some moments that were slightly uncomfortable to read. It also offered up an interesting look at mob mentality.Saying that, the ending was somewhat anti-climatic, but all in all not a bad little read.

I’d recommend you read this one when the weather starts turning and you’re gearing up for Halloween.

Star Rating out of 5: 3.5

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? I’d love to hear, please comment below.

Happy reading.

G.
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Book Review – The Penguin Book of Witches by Katharine Howe

In modern day society when you hear the word ‘Witch’ an image is conjured to mind of Halloween, a crooked nose and a pointed cap and the sad fact is, at one point in time there were actual women who were persecuted by their community because they were believed to have been consorting with the Devil and were condemned as Witches.

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The Penguin Book of Witches by Katharine Howe is an incredibly detailed novel. Howe has done extensive research into the Witch Trials that took place not only here in the UK, but in America and most notably Salem. There are excerpts from novels written at the time, interviews that took place, trial notes and much more in this book.

This a fantastic piece of work which not only sheds a light on the horrific ways in which women were tried but also shows how delusional and brainwashed people were. It also seems that women of a lower class seemed to be targeted by these Witch Hunters and how much easier it seemed to place the blame of death on any woman accused of having ‘spirit guides’ which to the modern person would just be a lonely old woman who speaks to her cats.

In depth, eye opening and fascinating, this book makes for a great read even if you’re not interested in the history of the witch trials. My only criticism is some of the Old English words took a while to work around to make it easy flowing.

Star Rating out of 5: 3.5

‘Sickness from unhygienic conditions made for a high infant mortality rate, but those deaths were easier to bear if they could be blamed on someone else’

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